SparkPeople Advertisers Keep the Site Free

4.4 of 5 (8)
Create a Recipe Makeover

Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 8
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 130.8
  • Total Fat: 1.3 g
  • Cholesterol: 0.0 mg
  • Sodium: 147.9 mg
  • Total Carbs: 25.8 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 2.1 g
  • Protein: 3.8 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Quinoa-Flax Seed Pizza Dough calories by ingredient
Report Inappropriate Recipe

Quinoa-Flax Seed Pizza Dough

Submitted by: SPCOOKBOOK
Quinoa-Flax Seed Pizza Dough

Introduction

When choosing a pizza dough, itís often a battle of nutrition versus taste. White-flour varieties lack
fiber, but whole-wheat versions lack texture. The solution is a hybrid dough. In this recipe, I experimented
with quinoa, a seed thatís eaten like a grain. High in fiber and full of protein, I wanted to see
whether it could be ground up and used to boost the nutrition of our pizza dough. Combined with
some ground flaxseeds, this dough is tasty and more nutritious than a standard pizza dough. Use all
quinoa flour and youíll have a gluten-free dough.

If you canít find quinoa flour, make your own by grinding whole quinoa in a clean coffee grinder.
One-third cup whole quinoa yields 1⁄2 cup quinoa flour.
When choosing a pizza dough, itís often a battle of nutrition versus taste. White-flour varieties lack
fiber, but whole-wheat versions lack texture. The solution is a hybrid dough. In this recipe, I experimented
with quinoa, a seed thatís eaten like a grain. High in fiber and full of protein, I wanted to see
whether it could be ground up and used to boost the nutrition of our pizza dough. Combined with
some ground flaxseeds, this dough is tasty and more nutritious than a standard pizza dough. Use all
quinoa flour and youíll have a gluten-free dough.

If you canít find quinoa flour, make your own by grinding whole quinoa in a clean coffee grinder.
One-third cup whole quinoa yields 1⁄2 cup quinoa flour.

Number of Servings: 8

Ingredients

    1 1⁄2 cups all-purpose flour
    1⁄2 cup quinoa flour
    2 tbsp ground flaxseeds
    1⁄2 tsp salt
    1 package instant dry yeast (21⁄4 tsp)
    1 tsp honey
    2⁄3 cup water (heated to 100į to 110į F)
    1 to 2 tbsp all-purpose flour, for dusting

Directions

1. Place the flours, flaxseeds, salt, and yeast in
a food processor and pulse to combine.
2. Combine honey and water, then pour into the
feed tube of the food processor. Process until
the dough forms a ball.
3. Turn the dough out onto a counter and
use the heel of your hands to knead until it is
smooth, about 5 minutes. If the dough sticks to
your hands, add a little more flour.
4. Prepare a bowl with nonstick cooking spray.
Add the dough and turn it to coat on all sides.
Cover with plastic wrap and place in a warm,
draft-free area until the dough doubles in size,
about 1 hour. If you are freezing the dough,
wrap the ball tightly in plastic wrap at this point
and place in the freezer. It will keep for up to 3
months. When ready to use, thaw the dough
overnight in the refrigerator and proceed to the
next step.
5. Remove the dough to a floured surface, then
roll into a 16-inch circle with a rolling pin and
top as desired.






Great Stories from around the Web


Rate This Recipe



Member Ratings For This Recipe


  • Very Good
    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
    If you canít find quinoa flour, make your own by grinding whole quinoa in a clean coffee grinder.
    One-third cup whole quinoa yields 1⁄2 cup quinoa flour. - 9/7/12

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No


  • 2 of 2 people found this review helpful
    I don't have quinoa FLOUR on hand, so I found online how to make your own from whole quinoa. Thought this might help:
    www.quinoa-nutritionfacts.com/How-to-Mak
    e-Quinoa-Flour.html - 11/6/11

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No

  • Very Good
    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
    I made my own version of this because I didn't find quinoa flour and didn't want to buy flax seeds: I substituted all the flour with high-protein version of wheat flour and flax seeds with hemp seeds. It was really good and an easy way to eat healthy hemp seeds. :) - 2/3/12

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No


  • 1 of 2 people found this review helpful
    yeast needs sweetener added to warm water to make it work. I will try this and let you know if there is a sweet taste to the crust, when it is finished. Check out the cauliflower crust, also. - 1/27/12

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No

  • Incredible!
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    I use whole wheat and quinoa is essentially the same recipe! It is one that people love! For the person asking about quinoa, I've used ground oatmeal and tried sesame seeeds. Oatmeal was good, sesame needed more whole wheat four, but tasted great! - 11/6/11

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No
  • I like the taste but the dough is not big enough to cover my pizza pan. I've made it a couple of times with the same result. I am not sure what I am doing wrong. - 5/11/13

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No


  • 0 of 1 people found this review helpful
    Do these crusts freeze well? - 2/27/12

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No
  • I liked it a lot! I'm not sure I can find quinoa around here... I'll try my best in looking! - 2/21/12

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No


  • 0 of 2 people found this review helpful
    I really like the idea of this dough instead of ordinary wheat dough.
    But - please - what is the benefit of adding honey?
    I know it's only 1 tsp - but I just do not do sweet stuff. - 11/7/11

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No
  • Thanks for a gluten free pizza crust! What joy to have a nutritious crust - I'll be making it with all quinoa flour - 11/6/11

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No
  • I work in a group home and made this at work for supper. I used whole wheat flour and extra water to make the dough form a ball (adding to the fiber content of the dough). The resulting pizza was a hit! I made 3 more batches of dough and froze them for the future! - 10/8/11

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No


  • 0 of 1 people found this review helpful
    I can not get quinoa flour where I live, what can I substitute? - 10/6/11

    Was this review helpful?   yes  No