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Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 24
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 68.5
  • Total Fat: 1.0 g
  • Cholesterol: 0.0 mg
  • Sodium: 80.7 mg
  • Total Carbs: 12.9 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 2.4 g
  • Protein: 2.5 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Multi Grain Rolls calories by ingredient
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Multi Grain Rolls



Introduction

When I started to track my recipes and daily meals on SparkPeople, I felt reassured that I was eating a well-balanced diet. One thing did surprise me: sodium.

I cook with as little salt as possible, so I knew the salt wasn't coming from my recipes. I eat very little processed foods and no fast food, so those weren't to blame. The culprit: bread! Homemade bread contains much less sodium than supermarket bread. If sodium is a concern to you, you should be making your own bread at home. It's easier than you think.

If cooking is an art and baking is a science, then bread baking can seem like advanced quantum physics. That doesn't have to be the case. You can make hearty, healthy, homemade bread in just a couple of hours.

Rolls are easier to bake than a whole loaf of bread, and they're instantly portion controlled. There's no guessing about how much you're really eating, and these are portable and versatile.

The recipe yields two dozen rolls, but if you want to use them for sandwiches, shape them into 12 rolls.
When I started to track my recipes and daily meals on SparkPeople, I felt reassured that I was eating a well-balanced diet. One thing did surprise me: sodium.

I cook with as little salt as possible, so I knew the salt wasn't coming from my recipes. I eat very little processed foods and no fast food, so those weren't to blame. The culprit: bread! Homemade bread contains much less sodium than supermarket bread. If sodium is a concern to you, you should be making your own bread at home. It's easier than you think.

If cooking is an art and baking is a science, then bread baking can seem like advanced quantum physics. That doesn't have to be the case. You can make hearty, healthy, homemade bread in just a couple of hours.

Rolls are easier to bake than a whole loaf of bread, and they're instantly portion controlled. There's no guessing about how much you're really eating, and these are portable and versatile.

The recipe yields two dozen rolls, but if you want to use them for sandwiches, shape them into 12 rolls.

Number of Servings: 24

Ingredients

    2 cups whole grain white bread flour
    1 cup whole wheat flour
    1 TBSP flax seed meal
    1 packet active dry yeast
    1 tsp sugar
    1 tsp kosher salt
    10 oz water

    1/2 tsp olive oil to coat bowl

    Topping:
    1 TBSP sunflower seeds
    1 TBSP flax seeds
    2 TBSP oatmeal
    1 TBSP sesame seeds

Directions

2 dozen rolls.

Preheat oven to 375F.

In a glass mix together active dry yeast, sugar and 2 oz of (110F) water. Allow to sit in a warm location for 5 minutes. Should double in size according to package directions.

In the bowl of a standing mixer with a dough hook, combine flours, flax meal and salt. Slowly pour in yeast water, then remaining 8 oz water. Mix together until a well developed dough forms, about 10 minutes. Dough should be smooth, moist, and slightly sticky. Additional water may be necessary depending on humidity.

Coat a big bowl with olive oil. Smooth dough into a ball and place in bowl. Place bowl in a warm place, and cover with plastic wrap. Allow dough to ferment for 1 hour 15 minutes, or until double in size. Remove dough from bowl and press down on gases built up in dough. Divide dough into 24 balls, slightly smaller than a golf ball. Roll until smooth, then coat in topping. Place rolls on parchment lined sheet pan, leaving 2" room between each roll.

Cover with plastic wrap, or a damp towel, and allow to proof in a warm place until double in size, about 40 minutes.

Brush each roll with water, then place in the oven and bake until golden brown, firm and hollow when tapped.

Can be kept frozen, thawed and reheated before serving.





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Member Ratings For This Recipe

  • I apparently cannot bake bread. The dough didn't double in size after I shaped them into rolls (did I work it too much?) They tasted good but were dense & chewy. Also goofed by not storing them in the fridge, so they got moldy after a few days. Probably won't be brave enough to try these again. - 7/1/10

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