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Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 10
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 39.1
  • Total Fat: 2.2 g
  • Cholesterol: 8.8 mg
  • Sodium: 35.4 mg
  • Total Carbs: 1.5 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 0.0 g
  • Protein: 3.2 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Homemade Ricotta Cheese calories by ingredient
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Homemade Ricotta Cheese

Submitted by: CHEF_MEG
Homemade Ricotta Cheese

Introduction

Chef Meg's homemade and natural ricotta cheese is easy to make and a fun project for someone who likes to cook. Chef Meg's homemade and natural ricotta cheese is easy to make and a fun project for someone who likes to cook.
Number of Servings: 10

Ingredients

    2 quarts 2% milk
    2 1/2 c low-fat buttermilk

Tips



In summertime, when herbs are abundant and fresh berries are in season, it's the perfect time to try this. You can even get the kids involved.


Directions

Line a strainer with 5 layers of cheesecloth or 3 cotton kitchen towels.
Pour the milk and buttermilk into a non-reactive saucepan set over moderate heat.
Insert a thermometer into the saucepan.
Stir occasionally until the mixture reaches 170 degrees F. Do not allow the mixture to boil.
Once the mixture reaches 170 degrees, stop stirring.
Curds will begin to form. Allow the pan to remain on the heat until the mixture reaches 190 degrees.
Remove from heat and place in your lined strainer. Allow to drain for 5 minutes. Bring up the ends of the cloth and twist to strain out any moisture that is left. Place in an airtight container for up to 5 days in the refrigerator. Makes 10 ounces.





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Member Ratings For This Recipe



  • 9 of 9 people found this review helpful
    How can I tell if my saucepan is non-reactive or not? - 11/18/10

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  • Very Good
    7 of 8 people found this review helpful
    @anewdawn30 - A nonreactive pan is nonstick, cast-iron or enameled. High-acid foods will react with aluminum, tin or copper (reactive) and cause a bad taste, or ruin your food.

    @slimlila - Try making bread! http://ow.ly/3I5Ye - 1/21/11

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  • 7 of 8 people found this review helpful
    Incredibly good. Today, for a dessert option, I switched out the 2% for lowfat chocolate milk. I added one Tablespoon of lemon juice at the end to help form the curds and had to cook it about 5 min longer but it turned into a dandy dessert with cherries atop. Obviously changes the nutritional info. - 10/9/10

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  • Incredible!
    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
    Quick and simple. I usually have to add some lemon, but this worked without it. I used the full cream milk with kefir instead of buttermilk. The cheese came out pretty solid, almost like mozzarella. I mixed it with sour cream and some vanilla sugar and used it as filling for crepes. Big hit! - 11/25/10

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  • 3 of 4 people found this review helpful
    Don't throw the whey away! There are many uses for it. Here are some ideas. Look for more online.
    http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2011/
    06/16-ways-to-use-your-whey.html - 3/27/12

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  • Incredible!
    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
    I have made this for years. I make it all the time and love it. - 6/9/10

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  • 2 of 2 people found this review helpful
    Here's what puzzles me.
    If I compare your nutritional values to those of the ingredients, I have to conclude that the liquid you drain off contains most of the food value. Precisely:
    Calories: 83
    Fat: 1.8
    Carbs: 10.5
    Protein: 20.8

    My question is this. Is there any good use for this liquid? - 7/13/11

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  • Incredible!
    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
    Fun and easy. About non-reactive pans. Enamel with NO Chips is fine, stainless steel is best. Stove-top safe glass also good. DO NO USE seasoned cast iron, aluminum, or non-stick. Stainless is the easiest to locate, but you want a heavy like encapsulated bottom to prevent scorching & a thermometer - 3/6/11

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  • Incredible!
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    I've made cheeses for years, but always with rennet, with the exception of ricotta, which I did the traditional way of boiling down the whey and fine curds. This is a really great way of doing it - I like the tangy result! I used skim milk for mine to further reduce the fat. - 6/12/12

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  • Very Good
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    I use Stainless Steel. I do belive that cast iron is also reactive. - 6/10/12

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  • Incredible!
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    So easy and quick! Had trouble squeezing the liquid form the hot curds, even after draining. Turns out I squeezed too much and when using for the Balsamic Strawberry recipe I had to add water to the mix to get it smooth, jut AFTER I got rid of the whey! Save it in case yours is too thick. - 4/4/11

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  • Incredible!
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    this sounds so easy well be trying it for sure aloha janet - 7/18/10

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  • Love to make this but I do add salt to the warm milk for flavor. Please! Don't throw away the liquid which is whey like in Little Miss Muffitt.
    I flavor mine with a little vinegar and salt. It makes a nutritious and yummy drink all by itself and can be used in cooking as well.
    - 10/18/12

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  • Just made a batch. Yum! Even my mother liked it. - 6/9/12

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  • Looks interesting, I think I've read a recipe like this where they recommend using the whey as the liquid in baking but I didn't try it yet. I'd also like to know if it works with skim instead. - 7/28/11

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  • I need to use lactose-free starting ingredients. Does anyone have a suggestion for buttermilk? I live in an area where we have good access to goat milk products and lactose-free milk but I have never seen lactose-free buttermilk. Any suggestions would be appreciated. - 6/9/11

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  • 0 of 1 people found this review helpful
    this won't work if you don't use whole milk. A stainless steel pan is non-reactive. & I am not sure what are the calories for the whey. It is delicious with a little sweetner esp. warm. - 1/31/11

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  • When I enter the info in the recipe Calculator I get different values.... This sounds like a wonderful way to get my dairy in... - 1/22/11

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  • Incredible!
    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
    Interesting! I'm making a zucchini lasagna this weekend so maybe I'll make my own ricotta too! Can you use fat-free milk? - 1/21/11

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  • Thank you, I didn't realize you could make your own. - 1/7/11

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  • and what do you do with the whey? I plan to try this, I never knew it was this easy! - 1/5/11

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  • To "CAZBRAZ" the metric conversion of a quart is 1000 ml. "C'' does mean cup = 240 ml. - 9/17/10

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  • 1 qt= 1000 ml and yes c=cup or 8 oz - 9/10/10

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  • I want to make this in the UK - what metric measurement is a quart please? and does 'c' mean cup? - 9/7/10

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  • I've got to try this. We love Ricotta. - 9/7/10

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  • can you use skim milk and fat free buttermilk? - 8/11/10

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  • Glad I saw this, thanks for giving me this recipe - 8/8/10

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  • I have learned to make my own Creme Fraiche. Now I can make my own Ricotta Cheese. Thank you, Chef Meg! - 6/10/10

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