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Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 4
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 72.0
  • Total Fat: 4.8 g
  • Cholesterol: 186.0 mg
  • Sodium: 71.0 mg
  • Total Carbs: 0.4 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 0.0 g
  • Protein: 6.3 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Kitchen Basics: Perfect Boiled Eggs calories by ingredient
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Kitchen Basics: Perfect Boiled Eggs

Submitted by: CHEF_MEG
Kitchen Basics: Perfect Boiled Eggs

Introduction

The best boiled eggs are simmered gently then steeped to keep them tender, not rubbery. The best boiled eggs are simmered gently then steeped to keep them tender, not rubbery.
Number of Servings: 4

Ingredients

    4 large eggs


Tips

Having trouble peeling your eggs? Try using not so fresh eggs; they peel easier.

Bonus: Soak the eggs in water overnight with various infusions to create naturally-dyed Easter eggs.


These infused eggs are a pretty, tasty addition to steamed asparagus, salad Nicoise, or an antipasto platter.

Why simmer and not boil eggs? Boiling eggs will produce tough rubbery eggs that run the risk of breaking while cooking. Simmering them cooks them gently and allows residual heat from the boiling water to do most of the work. Your eggs will be tender, and they won't have that unsavory gray-green ring around the yolk.


Directions

Place the eggs in the medium saucepan full of water set over medium-high heat.

When the water begins to boil, cover the pan and remove it from heat. Leave the eggs in the water for 8-10 minutes.

Use a slotted spoon to remove the eggs from the water.

Tip: Peel the eggs under cold running water.

1 egg per serving






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Member Ratings For This Recipe


  • Very Good
    28 of 28 people found this review helpful
    If you add a little vinegar to fresh eggs when you simmer or boil them the egg shell is peeled away very easily - 3/27/12

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  • Incredible!
    17 of 17 people found this review helpful
    I say this with love...Chef Meg's recipes are a highlight of what this site has to offer. Seriously if a recipe ruins your day, you really need to re-evaluate what is truly wrong. This site offers a lot of good guidance all for free, the recipe you dislike has helped another reach their goal. - 3/27/12

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  • Very Good
    15 of 15 people found this review helpful
    I recently discovered that my old rice cooker/food steamer is perfect for this chore. A dozen eggs in the steamer basket, turn the dial to 27 minutes and walk away. When the bell dings, I immersed the steamer basket in cold water. The eggs are perfectly hard boiled and peel beautifully. Easy peasy - 4/1/12

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  • 8 of 9 people found this review helpful
    Some of the people in these comments need to watch the movie Bambi. I think it is Thumper's mom who reminds him that "If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all." It is quite possible to ask questions and make suggestions without sounding surly and critical. - 3/29/12

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  • Very Good
    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
    For firm white & yolk I let my eggs sit for 12 minutes. I usually do an extra egg as a tester (and a snack). I have a wide mouth electric tea kettle with an auto shut off that is perfect for 10 large eggs. - 3/27/12

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  • 5 of 5 people found this review helpful
    you can tie a dany lion flower to the egg [flower side against the shell] then add onion skins to the water when you cook the eggs. it makes a pretty, natural dyed egg.
    - 3/27/12

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  • O.K.
    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
    By adding a tsp of baking soda to teh water, you will change teh Ph and the shells will come off easier. - 3/27/12

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  • Incredible!
    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
    Unlike some of the grumblers, I like hearing about infusing the eggs with other flavors. I already knew about the cooking method. Thanks Chef Meg. - 3/27/12

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  • Incredible!
    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
    I have always wondered why I have rubbery eggs and most of the egg comes off with the shell. What a difference. - 3/27/12

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  • 3 of 3 people found this review helpful
    This simmering technique sounds good. My husband makes good boiled eggs but he boils the water first and then puts in the eggs, cooks 5 minutes for soft boiled and 7 minutes for firm. I like the idea of simmering. We live in Norway where it is normal to eat eggs in egg cups as shown in the photo. - 3/29/12

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  • 3 of 3 people found this review helpful
    FENINCYBER, you obviously never make soft-boiled eggs. The eggs on the picture look perfect to a European who eats the eggs out of an egg cup. We have a little 'egg puncher', to make tiny holes on both sides of the egg, and the shell never breaks while boiling. Soft-boiled eggs are easier to digest. - 3/27/12

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  • Incredible!
    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
    The science behind this method is clear. Cooling eggs immediately, or slightly cracking the shell and putting them back into the water, stops the anaerobic reaction of iron from the yolk with hydrogen sulfide from the white that creates the greenish ferrous sulfide. Thanks, Meg! - 3/27/12

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  • Incredible!
    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
    I love hard boiled eggs but have always had 2 major problems. They come out rubbery with the green ring around the yolk and I can rarely peel an egg without the shell sticking to the egg. We own a chicken farm (yard chickens)so my eggs are fresh and plentiful. Thanks Meg for the great ideas! - 3/27/12

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  • 2 of 3 people found this review helpful
    It seems like a lot of work for something so simple.
    - 3/27/12

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  • Bad
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    Interesting method - 4/18/13

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  • Incredible!
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    yum! and from someone who can burn water it was super easy. - 1/9/13

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  • Incredible!
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    Thank you Chief Meg. My eggs were beautiful and NO cracks or leakage. Now I can have perfect hard boiled eggs every time. I always wondered about the grey green ring around the yoke! - 3/27/12

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  • 1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    I haven't used infusion ingredients with eggs before. They turned out very well. - 3/27/12

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  • 1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    thank you, i was not sure of the procedure...i had tried a variation of this and was allmost there, now i will be...we will try the infusions, also, looks interesting - 3/27/12

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  • 1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    really good---a nice version-- - 3/27/12

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  • 1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    I look forward to trying this new way of doing eggs as well as Tony's vinegar tip. I like the idea of infusing eggs with flavors. Onion skins make a beautiful yellow dye. I'll try this for Passover. - 3/27/12

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  • 1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    This is great! I've been looking for this recipe for a while. My Chinese friend makes this and it's so good! Since I am hypoglycemic, I tend to grab an egg at 10:30 every morning just to make it to lunch time. - 3/27/12

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  • 1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    This recipe is similar to Chinese tea eggs. The "tea taste" is not gross. It adds a little flavor, not a lot. And you can use other spices too (Chinese 5 spice packs a punch!) I haven't made these in awhile, going to have to do that now. Especially since my non-Chinese husband LOVES them. - 3/27/12

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  • 1 of 1 people found this review helpful
    Our neighbor used onion skins to dye Easter eggs when I was little. This "recipe" came along just in time for use this holiday. Thanks, Meg! - 3/27/12

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  • If you steam your eggs they also peel easily. I have done this with just a couple day old eggs. - 4/16/14

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