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Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 12
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 106.3
  • Total Fat: 1.8 g
  • Cholesterol: 1.3 mg
  • Sodium: 204.0 mg
  • Total Carbs: 13.1 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 6.2 g
  • Protein: 9.4 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Low Carb English Muffins calories by ingredient
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Low Carb English Muffins

Submitted by: RHOADAN

Introduction

From Dana Carpender's 1001 Low Carb Recipes. She writes her bread recipes on the assumption that people have a bread machine. I've always hand kneaded my breads, so I'm fiddling with the rising time here. We'll see how many tries it takes me to get it right. From Dana Carpender's 1001 Low Carb Recipes. She writes her bread recipes on the assumption that people have a bread machine. I've always hand kneaded my breads, so I'm fiddling with the rising time here. We'll see how many tries it takes me to get it right.
Number of Servings: 12

Ingredients

    1/2 cup Water, warm
    1/2 cup Yogurt, plain, whole milk
    1 tsp Salt
    2/3 cup Vital wheat gluten
    1/4 cup psyllium
    2 tbsp Wheat Germ - Raw
    1/4 cup Wheat bran, crude
    1/2 cup Flour, oat
    1/4 cup Hemp/Protein Powder Vanilla (Trade Joe's Brand)
    1 1/2 tsp Active Dry Yeast

Tips

Proofing the yeast: Yeast is a living organism, and can survive only so long in cold storage in any form. When setting out to make a yeasted bread, especially if you've had the yeast for a while, it's a good idea to make sure it's still alive before you use it, hence proofing. This involves dissolving the yeast in warm water and feeding it carbs. Honey or sugar are traditional, but starch from flour works fine, if not as quickly. The only thing with a notable carb content in this recipe is the oat flour, so that's what I 'm using for proofing. Carpender doesn't mention proofing yeast which is fine if you're baking for the first time or bake yeasted goods every week, but not if you haven't baked for a while and you've got old yeast sitting in the fridge.


Directions

1) Add yeast, and 1tsp oat flour to water and set aside to see if it bubbles. (This is called "proofing the yeast").

2) Mix remaining dry ingredients together in a bowl, then add yogurt and yeast water. Mix thoroughly, then cover the bowl and place it somewhere warm. Let rise until roughly doubled. (I plan to start with an hour's rise time then apply the finger test: poke the dough gently; if it bounces back instantly, let it rise some more. If it doesn't recover at all, start over. If it partly recovers, time to deflate.)

3) Turn dough out on a floured board (use oat flour, as little as possible), and roll out to approximate 1/2 inch thick.

4) Cut circles from the dough, and place on a cookie sheet. It may be possible to find a suitable size biscuit cutter, but a tuna can with both top and bottom removed works well. Cover and let rise for approximately one hour or until doubled.

5) Heat a griddle or skillet on medium low, and sprinkle it with wheat germ to prevent sticking. Place as many muffins on the cooking surface as will easily fit. Cook on each side for approximately six minutes. Basically, the idea is to cook the muffins until they're cooked halfway through, flip them and finish the job. This sets up the ability to split them with a fork.



Serving Size: 12 servings 1/2 muffin each






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