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Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 4
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 200.4
  • Total Fat: 5.1 g
  • Cholesterol: 65.7 mg
  • Sodium: 565.1 mg
  • Total Carbs: 4.2 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 1.8 g
  • Protein: 34.7 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Pesce Arragosto con Capperi calories by ingredient
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Pesce Arragosto con Capperi

Submitted by: JVANAM

Introduction

Caper bushes are everywhere in Sicily, growing wild in small crevices on stone walls.

The flower is beautiful and delicate.

When I was in Trieste I remember becoming excited to find some caper bushes growing in the crevices of the wall of a very old church called San Giusto. They grow mostly on the Northern Mediterranean.

At home I have an old Italian family store that sells capperi preserved in rock salt rather than in brine they taste like unadulterated capers rather than capers in vinegar. Salted capers need to be thoroughly rinsed, then soaked for about 30 minutes and rinsed again, depending on the brand of capers - the easiest way to tell if they are still too salty is to taste them and then soak them again. This can become a sit down job. You take a taste, you rinse, you drink a little Chianti, you play some dominos, and you repeat the process.

Capers in the vinegar brine impart a particular flavor and are more acceptable in recipes where wine or vinegar is one of the ingredients.

They are extensively used in Sicilian cooking and Sicilians prefer the smaller capers. Good quality ones come from Salina (one of the Aeolian islands) or Pantelleria (an island, southwest of Sicily and closer to North Africa).

Apparently in some parts of Sicily, it is common to boil the leaves and the young shoots in salty water, then they need to be drained well, dressed with good quality olive oil and lemon juice and eaten as a vegetable.

The caper flower/buds need to be soaked in water for at least 2-3 days (apparently they have some bitter taste, like olives) and then are preserved under salt or under vinegar.

I learned this dish not from some Hottie Tottie Chef, but from a fisherman whose boat my friends & I rent for a day at sea. From his FRESH catch he docked the boat in shallow water. We had to walk to a sandy beach in hip high water to start a fire pit and grill the tuna near where it was caught.

Crack open a new bottle of Chianti while the fish cooks.

With sunset falling, eating and drinking something so fresh is an experience I never have been able to repeat.

For home cooking I have made a few adjustments.
Caper bushes are everywhere in Sicily, growing wild in small crevices on stone walls.

The flower is beautiful and delicate.

When I was in Trieste I remember becoming excited to find some caper bushes growing in the crevices of the wall of a very old church called San Giusto. They grow mostly on the Northern Mediterranean.

At home I have an old Italian family store that sells capperi preserved in rock salt rather than in brine they taste like unadulterated capers rather than capers in vinegar. Salted capers need to be thoroughly rinsed, then soaked for about 30 minutes and rinsed again, depending on the brand of capers - the easiest way to tell if they are still too salty is to taste them and then soak them again. This can become a sit down job. You take a taste, you rinse, you drink a little Chianti, you play some dominos, and you repeat the process.

Capers in the vinegar brine impart a particular flavor and are more acceptable in recipes where wine or vinegar is one of the ingredients.

They are extensively used in Sicilian cooking and Sicilians prefer the smaller capers. Good quality ones come from Salina (one of the Aeolian islands) or Pantelleria (an island, southwest of Sicily and closer to North Africa).

Apparently in some parts of Sicily, it is common to boil the leaves and the young shoots in salty water, then they need to be drained well, dressed with good quality olive oil and lemon juice and eaten as a vegetable.

The caper flower/buds need to be soaked in water for at least 2-3 days (apparently they have some bitter taste, like olives) and then are preserved under salt or under vinegar.

I learned this dish not from some Hottie Tottie Chef, but from a fisherman whose boat my friends & I rent for a day at sea. From his FRESH catch he docked the boat in shallow water. We had to walk to a sandy beach in hip high water to start a fire pit and grill the tuna near where it was caught.

Crack open a new bottle of Chianti while the fish cooks.

With sunset falling, eating and drinking something so fresh is an experience I never have been able to repeat.

For home cooking I have made a few adjustments.

Number of Servings: 4

Ingredients

    4 firm fresh 4 oz. fish steaks (I prefer Yellow fin Tuna)
    1 Tbsp EVOO
    4 slices of fresh lemon
    1/4 cup capers, rinsed and drained
    1 Tbsp chopped Italian parsley
    Dash of Balsamic Vinegar
    1/8 tsp salt
    White pepper to taste

Directions

===This recipe can be grilled or oven backed.===
1) Preheat the oven or grill to 400 degrees F.

2) Rinse the fish steaks and pat dry with paper towels.

3) On a square of parchment paper, slightly more than twice the size of the fish, place the fish on half of the parchment.

4) Drizzle a touch of olive oil, & season each fish with a slice of lemon, 1 Tbsp capers, pinch of parsley, dash of vinegar, S & P to taste.

5) Fold the bottom and top of each parchment sheet over. Fold the edges over a second time and crimp to completely enclose the fish and juices inside.

6) For oven bakers, place the packets on a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes. About half way through baking turn the baking sheet around to equalize the ovens hot spots.

7) For grillers, with an offset heat style technique, place you packets on the side of the grill away from the coals or flame. Grill-bake for 10 minutes on each side.

8) With both cooking techniques the packets will puff up from the trapped steam. BE CAREFULL...the packet may seem warm to the touch, but the internal steam can burn your skin. Before serving, place the enclosed packets on a heat resistant serving dish. With a long knife pierce the top of the packet to release some of the steam.

===If you are going to try this on the beach you can use foil wrap in place of parchment paper.

Or do as this fisherman did.

He had two cast iron pans. The edges of both pans had an interlocking grip on the side opposite the handle.

He placed the fish in the bottom pan, locked the top pan to it, & placed the pan into the hot burning embers. He then placed some of the embers on top of the pans.

As the embers cooled he just burned more wood and continued the process for just under 40 minutes.

The entire meal was orgasmic.===

+++A great side dish to this would be grilled onions and multi-colored peppers. For more formal occasions a serving of asparagus, fennel, radicchio, and orange slices with balsamic.+++

Individual serving size is 1 fish steak.

Number of Servings: 4

Recipe submitted by SparkPeople user JVANAM.






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