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Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 8
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 256.8
  • Total Fat: 13.2 g
  • Cholesterol: 17.1 mg
  • Sodium: 565.3 mg
  • Total Carbs: 25.7 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 2.0 g
  • Protein: 8.7 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Prassopita (Potato & Leek Pie) calories by ingredient
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Prassopita (Potato & Leek Pie)

Submitted by: JVANAM

Introduction

Phyllo (a.k.a. filo or fillo) is used in many different Greek, Turkish, & Bulgarian cuisines.

Most Americans know filo from Spanokopita (spinach pie) or Baklava. The tissue thin dough is a mix of local flour, water, the merest touch of Olive Oil, & an acid. Most often lemon juice or vinegar.

In the US Phyllo comes frozen. Depending on your fav. brand each sheet unwrapped is between 9"x14" up to 13"x18".

You want to keep Phyllo frozen until the day before use. Let it thaw in the fridge for over 6 hours or overnight. About 1/2 hour before you are ready to use it remove the Phyllo from the fridge, & unroll (or unfold as the case maybe) the dough. Allow the dough to lie flat, but don't force it. Cover with a sheet of plastic wrap, slightly larger than the dough, & cover with clean cloth towel.

In this dish it is best if the dough does not tear, but don't go postal if it does. Just find another torn piece and make a patch.

On its own filo is low in fat, but when you start to lather on butter or oil the fat content soars.

Though this recipe is based on a trad. recipe I have cut back on the fats where I could.

Now for my rant.

LEEKS... Most of the contempory TV ?Chef's? have little or no clue when they are using leeks, or when they are talking about leeks. As I grow leeks in both my Victory Garden and off season greenhouse it is now time for...

LEEKS 101: 1) Leeks are a member of the onion family. As such the bulb of the plant grows below ground.

2) To enhance the blanching of the bulb farmers will mound up mulch (usually top soil) around the collar of the leaf growth & covering the bulb. This action keeps the sun off the ground level portions of the plant. No sun, no photosynthesis, fewer green leaves, more white or light green roots to use in your cooking.

With the recent introduction of mulching (or growing) fabric more @ home growers are starting to use this method of water retention and light reduction to blanch their crops. I found using a black plastic mulching fabric around my leek collars to provide me the color I want without the annoying wash & rinse of each little piece of grit & sand.

3) If you buy your leeks @ the market you will have to take some time for cleaning. Here are some tips I have learned form restaurateurs around the world.

First, look at the leek to determine how you plan to cut it during prep. For some dishes you may want long leafy slices, others rings, still others julienne, or lastly slice it-chop it-throw it in the pot.

So here are some ways to deal:

For simple crossed cut disc. Make your slices, toss the rings into a glass bowl of ice cold water, slosh the leeks around for a couple minutes, drain & spin the leeks in a salad spinner. A nouvle-cusine favorite.

For long leafy cuts separate the individual leaves (down to the core) into a glass bowl of ice cold water, slosh the leeks around for a couple minutes, drain, & place on a clean cloth towel to dry. The classic French style. Julia would be so-o-o proud of you.

For jullian, slice the bulb end into brush or broom like cuts. Be careful not to cut through the entire plant. With a large bowl of ice cold water whisk the cut end through the water for 2 or 3 minutes till the grit sinks to the bottom of the bowl. Slice of the cleaned portion off the plant & set in the salad spinner. Repeat the process until the entire leek has been sliced, rinsed, & in the spinner. Give your leeks a good spin to extract the water and place on paper towel to dry out even more. Very Tuscan of you.

Lastly, chop & slop. Take a leek...(you knew I had to do it somewhere)...chop up your leeks to your desired size & toss in a colander. Run the leeks under cold water in the sink. Give a quick shake and into the pot. Basically that is what we are doing here.
Phyllo (a.k.a. filo or fillo) is used in many different Greek, Turkish, & Bulgarian cuisines.

Most Americans know filo from Spanokopita (spinach pie) or Baklava. The tissue thin dough is a mix of local flour, water, the merest touch of Olive Oil, & an acid. Most often lemon juice or vinegar.

In the US Phyllo comes frozen. Depending on your fav. brand each sheet unwrapped is between 9"x14" up to 13"x18".

You want to keep Phyllo frozen until the day before use. Let it thaw in the fridge for over 6 hours or overnight. About 1/2 hour before you are ready to use it remove the Phyllo from the fridge, & unroll (or unfold as the case maybe) the dough. Allow the dough to lie flat, but don't force it. Cover with a sheet of plastic wrap, slightly larger than the dough, & cover with clean cloth towel.

In this dish it is best if the dough does not tear, but don't go postal if it does. Just find another torn piece and make a patch.

On its own filo is low in fat, but when you start to lather on butter or oil the fat content soars.

Though this recipe is based on a trad. recipe I have cut back on the fats where I could.

Now for my rant.

LEEKS... Most of the contempory TV ?Chef's? have little or no clue when they are using leeks, or when they are talking about leeks. As I grow leeks in both my Victory Garden and off season greenhouse it is now time for...

LEEKS 101: 1) Leeks are a member of the onion family. As such the bulb of the plant grows below ground.

2) To enhance the blanching of the bulb farmers will mound up mulch (usually top soil) around the collar of the leaf growth & covering the bulb. This action keeps the sun off the ground level portions of the plant. No sun, no photosynthesis, fewer green leaves, more white or light green roots to use in your cooking.

With the recent introduction of mulching (or growing) fabric more @ home growers are starting to use this method of water retention and light reduction to blanch their crops. I found using a black plastic mulching fabric around my leek collars to provide me the color I want without the annoying wash & rinse of each little piece of grit & sand.

3) If you buy your leeks @ the market you will have to take some time for cleaning. Here are some tips I have learned form restaurateurs around the world.

First, look at the leek to determine how you plan to cut it during prep. For some dishes you may want long leafy slices, others rings, still others julienne, or lastly slice it-chop it-throw it in the pot.

So here are some ways to deal:

For simple crossed cut disc. Make your slices, toss the rings into a glass bowl of ice cold water, slosh the leeks around for a couple minutes, drain & spin the leeks in a salad spinner. A nouvle-cusine favorite.

For long leafy cuts separate the individual leaves (down to the core) into a glass bowl of ice cold water, slosh the leeks around for a couple minutes, drain, & place on a clean cloth towel to dry. The classic French style. Julia would be so-o-o proud of you.

For jullian, slice the bulb end into brush or broom like cuts. Be careful not to cut through the entire plant. With a large bowl of ice cold water whisk the cut end through the water for 2 or 3 minutes till the grit sinks to the bottom of the bowl. Slice of the cleaned portion off the plant & set in the salad spinner. Repeat the process until the entire leek has been sliced, rinsed, & in the spinner. Give your leeks a good spin to extract the water and place on paper towel to dry out even more. Very Tuscan of you.

Lastly, chop & slop. Take a leek...(you knew I had to do it somewhere)...chop up your leeks to your desired size & toss in a colander. Run the leeks under cold water in the sink. Give a quick shake and into the pot. Basically that is what we are doing here.

Number of Servings: 8

Ingredients

    4 Tbsp Olive Oil (you don't need EVOO, a standard blend will do It's best to use an oil mister)
    4 cups of cleaned, chopped leeks (both the whites & greens) (about 4 to 5 medium leeks)
    3/4 Lb potatoes, scrubbed, peeled, and grated (I prefer Yukon Gold, most varieties will do, but not reds)
    Egg Substitute (equivalent to 1 to 2 eggs)
    2 Tbsp Skim Milk
    2 Tbsp fresh dill, chopped (or 2 tsp of dried dill)
    1/4 tsp ground black pepper
    8 sheets Phyllo dough, thawed (If you need additional prep time refrigerate the Phyllo until you are ready to use it)
    1 cup feta cheese, crumbled
    1/4 cup of black Kalamata olives (in a pinch you can sub-out green Greek olives or a combination of both)

Directions

1) Clean your leeks, pat dry on paper towels, & set aside.

2) Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F. Spray a 9 by 13 inch baking pan with a misting of olive oil.

3) Give a second oil misting to a large non-stick (or cast iron) pan. Heat pan over medium heat and add the leeks.

Cook the leeks until they have softened. Try to keep the leaves green, not caramelized. It should take less than 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and allow the leeks to rest and cool in a bowl.

4) In a separate large bowl combine potatoes, egg substitute, & milk. Stir in the dill and black pepper.

5) Take your resting Phyllo dough & line the bottom of the baking dish. Each sheet should cover the bottom and climb up the sides. Give the dough a gently mist of oil. Place another sheet of dough across the first layer and GENTLY press the second layer on to the first. Again a slight mist of oil.

Continue this criss-cross method until you have 4 layers of dough lining the bottom & sides of the dish.

Do not oil the fourth sheet.

6) Place half of the potato mixture on top of the dough. Sprinkle on about half of the feta and half of the olives.

Repeat the layering with the remaining potato mix, feta, & olives.

7) Just as in the bottom of the dish we repeat the process of layering 4 sheets of Phyllo (one criss-crossed sheet at a time). With each layer give the dough a light misting of oil. However this time you will give a misting to the top sheet as well. The top sheet needs a clear film of oil so the top layers will brown.

8) Pop the dish into the 375 degree F. oven until golden brown, about 45 minutes.

An individual serving size is a square about 4" x 3". With the leftovers for tomarrow breakfast with a veggie omelet.

===This dish is best served hot, but for kids you may want to let it rest outside the oven until its room temp.===

+++For you pre-planners or church dinner ladies. This dish can be made up to a week ahead. After itís baked and cooled, immediately cover the dish, tightly, with plastic wrap or wax paper. Pop it in to the freezer. When you are ready to reheat, in to a 350 degree oven it goes for 15 to 20 minutes. To warm through and crisp up the Phyllo.+++

Number of Servings: 8

Recipe submitted by SparkPeople user JVANAM.






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