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Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 4
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 376.3
  • Total Fat: 1.3 g
  • Cholesterol: 0.0 mg
  • Sodium: 238.2 mg
  • Total Carbs: 73.9 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 6.1 g
  • Protein: 15.3 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Tibetan Momo calories by ingredient
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Tibetan Momo

Submitted by: KATJWINTER
Tibetan Momo

Introduction

While very low in fat, these Tibetan dumplings (Momo) aren't very low in carbs or calories. But they are a heck of a lot better in that regard than the Momo I usually get at the Tibetan restaurant. So when i'm craving Momo, I prefer to have 4 of these (one serving) and a small salad with ginger dress and/or a miso-style soup. It's also a very fun dish to make with friends, as everyone loves making the little dumplings! While very low in fat, these Tibetan dumplings (Momo) aren't very low in carbs or calories. But they are a heck of a lot better in that regard than the Momo I usually get at the Tibetan restaurant. So when i'm craving Momo, I prefer to have 4 of these (one serving) and a small salad with ginger dress and/or a miso-style soup. It's also a very fun dish to make with friends, as everyone loves making the little dumplings!
Number of Servings: 4

Ingredients

    2 Cups All-Purpose Flour
    1 Cup Whole Wheat Flour
    1 Cup Water
    1/2 Cup Cabbage
    1/2 Onion
    1/2 Cup Mushrooms, pref. asian but regular are fine too.
    1/2 Box or 1/2 LB Firm Tofu (non-silken)
    2 Cloves Garlic, minced
    1 TSP Ground Ginger
    1 TBSP Soy Sauce
    1/2 Cup Fresh Cilantro

Directions

Makes 4 servings of 4 Momo per serving.

Instructions:

Add the 3 cups of flour to a large mixing bowl. Now gradually add water as you mix (by hand, not with a bread mixer) until the dough is moist and a bit sticky. You want to be able to shape it into a ball and be able to stretch it out a little before it breaks apart.

Now wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set aside, or to be more eco-friendly, place the dough ball in a non-stick pot and put the lid on. You don't want the dough to dry out.

Drain the tofu and crumble into a mixing bowl. Chop the Onion, Mushrooms, Cabbage, Garlic, and Cilantro and add to the tofu. Add the soy sauce and ginger powder and mix thoroughly.

At this point you should go ahead and get your water boiling in your steamer. For steaming you can use a standard pot and then place a steamer basket in it. You can use one made from bamboo, or from metal. There are also special steamer pots, which have special steamer inserts. You can get a similar insert for your standard pot (like a fancier version of the bamboo or metal steamers above). Also, even the cheapest rice cookers usually come with a little steamer tray. It allows you to load up the rice as normal, then put the steamer tray in place, and then cover. As the rice cooks, the veggies (or dumplings in this case), get steamed.

If you are using the rice cooker, you don't need to start the water boiling, because the rice cooker will take care of that step automagically for you.

Now that you've got the water going, set up your Dumpling Making Station. You will want a rolling pin, rolling pin cover (if you have one), cutting board or dough mat, a dish of extra flour for your hands and rolling surface, a teeny dish of about one tsp of olive or canola oil, and your steamer tray.

There are a few different ways to roll out the dough and form your dumplings. Here is my method:

1. Pull of a small amount of dough, about the size of a ping pong or golf ball.

2. Dust some flour between your fingers and roll the dough around in your hands to form a ball and to pick up some of the flour from your hands.

3. Plop the ball onto the cutting board and pat down into a thick round pad. Use the rolling pin to roll it out as evenenly as possible in every direction. You want to get the dough very thin, although not so thing that it rips.

4. Now pick up the circle of dough (or oddly mishapen geometric shape of dough) and place it in your left palm. Use a spoon (I like using an ice cream scoop) and grab about a tablespoon or a little more of the tofu mixture and place it in the center of the dough on your palm.

5. Use your right hand to pull up two sides of the dough to meet in the middle above the filling, sort of forming a basket. Rotate the dough in your palm and pull up a bit of dough from the side to meet at the top also. Continue this until you have a little round sack with a pinched up top. Make sure it's all sealed pretty well, because you don't want any of the juices escaping when it steams.
NOTE: You can also do the above on your rolling surface rather than the palm of your hand. That way allows you to use both hands to form the dumpling, which can be easier.

Another method is the same as the above, except in step 5 you simply pinch up all the dough together in a line, like forming a taco with the top sealed. Conversely, you can do this on the cutting board rather than in your palm, and simply fold over one side of the dough over the other to form a half-moon and pinch the edges down.

Now, as each dumpling is finished, dip your fingertip into the bit of oil and rub just a tiny bit on the bottom of the dumpling. This is just so the Momo don't stick to the steamer and tear when you try to remove them. Place each Momo on the steamer rack.

Once your steamer rack is full, check to see if your water is boiling. If it is, place the steamer rack in place and cover. Let steam for about 10 to 15 minutes. You will know they are done when they are slimy and sweaty looking, and feel firm to the touch - firm enough that you think you could pick one up without it falling apart. Which indeed is what you will need to do when they're ready - pick them up by hand or with tongs and move them to a place to cool down.

Or if you are using a rice cooker, place the rack into the rice cooker and turn it on. The rice cooker should tell you itself when it is finished (you may want to check your rice cooker's instruction booklet to be sure how the steamer part of it works).

You may need to make two or more batches. Make the 2nd batch while the first batch steams.
Once the first batch is done, move them to a a plate (with hands or tongs as described above) and cover with plastic wrap, or place them in a pot with a lid so they don't dry out. Put the new batch in the steamer and go.
Feel free to clean the kitchen while the 2nd batch steams ;) Or just start eating!

I like to dip them in a little Soy Sauce (or Braggs) mixed with a pinch of sugar and a generous sprinkle of ginger powder.

Mmmm Mmmm Momo!

Number of Servings: 4

Recipe submitted by SparkPeople user KATJWINTER.






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