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Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 8
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 45.6
  • Total Fat: 0.1 g
  • Cholesterol: 0.0 mg
  • Sodium: 1,799.0 mg
  • Total Carbs: 9.8 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 1.1 g
  • Protein: 2.7 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Adobong Gulay or Eggplant Adobo calories by ingredient
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Adobong Gulay or Eggplant Adobo


Adobong Gulay or Eggplant Adobo

Introduction

Adobo is a style of preparation, which in Philippine cuisine - is stewing in vinegar and soy sauce. This is an excellent Vegetarian dish. There are many Adobo recipes and you can use meat. This is my own style of cooking this Adobo but you can find other Adobo recipes using the website in my intro to my cookbook. Go check them out. You will be pleasently surprised. In the recipe below I prefer using the Phillipine Palm Vinegar or Paombong as it's referred or regular White Vinegar but you can use any Vinegar you like.

Try using this recipe with whole, hardboiled eggs. Follow the recipe as for the potatoes. When the potatoes are almost done, add the whole, peeled, hardboiled eggs, with a few cut marks (not deep) into the egg white to let the flavor penetrate the egg more easily. This particular dish (adobong itlog or egg adobo) really tastes well the next day. Any Adobo dish tastes even better when you let it sit for a day or two.



Adobo is a style of preparation, which in Philippine cuisine - is stewing in vinegar and soy sauce. This is an excellent Vegetarian dish. There are many Adobo recipes and you can use meat. This is my own style of cooking this Adobo but you can find other Adobo recipes using the website in my intro to my cookbook. Go check them out. You will be pleasently surprised. In the recipe below I prefer using the Phillipine Palm Vinegar or Paombong as it's referred or regular White Vinegar but you can use any Vinegar you like.

Try using this recipe with whole, hardboiled eggs. Follow the recipe as for the potatoes. When the potatoes are almost done, add the whole, peeled, hardboiled eggs, with a few cut marks (not deep) into the egg white to let the flavor penetrate the egg more easily. This particular dish (adobong itlog or egg adobo) really tastes well the next day. Any Adobo dish tastes even better when you let it sit for a day or two.




Number of Servings: 8

Ingredients

    Onions, raw, 1 large (remove)
    Garlic, 3 cloves (remove)
    Peppercorn, 1 serving (remove)
    Bay Leaf, 2 (remove)
    Vegetable Oil, 3 Tbsp (remove)
    *Potato, raw, 1/2 cup diced (remove)
    Japanese Eggplant, 1 lb. cubed (remove)
    *Soy Sauce, 1/4 cup (remove)
    Palm or White Vinegar, 1/4 cup (remove)
    Pepper, black, 1 dash (remove)
    Granulated Sugar, 1 dash (remove

Directions

In a Pan, heat oil then add peppercorn and bay leaves. When the bay leaves start to turn brown, add the garlic. Saute until brown. Then add the onion and fry until translucent. Add the pepper and the sugar, stir briefly to mix, then add the soy sauce and vinegar. Lower heat to medium then add the potatoes and eggplant. Stir briefly then simmer, covered, around 20 minutes for the potatoes and the eggplant. They should be soft but not mushy. Add water if liquid level drops too low. You don't want to burn this dish. You just need enough to cover ingredients.

Serve over rice. Serves up to 8 people depending on how much you want to make

Number of Servings: 8

Recipe submitted by SparkPeople user BOBBIY.






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