Splenda® Sugar Free version of Maine Down-East Country Apple Pie

Splenda® Sugar Free version of Maine Down-East Country Apple Pie
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Nutritional Info
  • Servings Per Recipe: 1
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 1,504.8
  • Total Fat: 49.7 g
  • Cholesterol: 237.0 mg
  • Sodium: 1,200.0 mg
  • Total Carbs: 266.2 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 33.9 g
  • Protein: 16.4 g

View full nutritional breakdown of Splenda® Sugar Free version of Maine Down-East Country Apple Pie calories by ingredient
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Introduction

While based on a recipe from Spenda®, this recipe closely resemble a tradition Maine Country Apple Pie home-baked in the 1950's.

Other than the substation of a non-caloric sweetener, the main difference is the prime ingredient would be heirloom sour green apples or crabapples from our own or local farm orchards. Pie crust was, of course, home made. The pie would have been baked in a wood-fired antique range with a huge oven.

A benefit of the old but reliable oven is a side-arm tank beside the oven would simultaneously produce hot water, and heat the kitchen while the pie baked.

The aroma of fruitwood mingled with the mouth-watering smell of apple pie baking gave free room odorizor while whetting the appetite of the entire household.

During long, cold winter months, apples "put away" from the fall harvest kept well until spring in the root cellar, protected from freezing by fragrant sawdust.

This version uses Granny Smith apples, but any firm apple can be substituted. Use a Pyrex or tin 9" pie pan.

In the traditional heirloom recipe the pie pan was likely a 10" or 12" stoneware or glazed terra cotta deep dish pan, similar to the material used in Bean Pots Like Bean Pots, the pie pans would be glazed inside and outside, but not on the bottom, for improved heat distribution and perfectly even browning. These old pie pans also kept the pie deliciously warm until served. Even a huge 12" pie would be consumed in one meal by a hungry, but appreciative family

"Ayuh! Mighty Wicked Receipt" (Recipe).

Charming, sturdy, and ample stoneware mixing bowls nested nicely, often with simple rings or floral decoration.
While based on a recipe from Spenda®, this recipe closely resemble a tradition Maine Country Apple Pie home-baked in the 1950's.

Other than the substation of a non-caloric sweetener, the main difference is the prime ingredient would be heirloom sour green apples or crabapples from our own or local farm orchards. Pie crust was, of course, home made. The pie would have been baked in a wood-fired antique range with a huge oven.

A benefit of the old but reliable oven is a side-arm tank beside the oven would simultaneously produce hot water, and heat the kitchen while the pie baked.

The aroma of fruitwood mingled with the mouth-watering smell of apple pie baking gave free room odorizor while whetting the appetite of the entire household.

During long, cold winter months, apples "put away" from the fall harvest kept well until spring in the root cellar, protected from freezing by fragrant sawdust.

This version uses Granny Smith apples, but any firm apple can be substituted. Use a Pyrex or tin 9" pie pan.

In the traditional heirloom recipe the pie pan was likely a 10" or 12" stoneware or glazed terra cotta deep dish pan, similar to the material used in Bean Pots Like Bean Pots, the pie pans would be glazed inside and outside, but not on the bottom, for improved heat distribution and perfectly even browning. These old pie pans also kept the pie deliciously warm until served. Even a huge 12" pie would be consumed in one meal by a hungry, but appreciative family

"Ayuh! Mighty Wicked Receipt" (Recipe).

Charming, sturdy, and ample stoneware mixing bowls nested nicely, often with simple rings or floral decoration.

Number of Servings: 1

Ingredients

    1 crust, single 9" Pie crust, frozen, ready-to-bake
    7 medium Granny Smith apples (preferably organic)
    • Substitute any firm baking, green, or sour apple
    • Heirloom apples, where available, produce a Blue Ribbon pie suitable for the County Fair Winter Fest.
    • Crabapples are a delicious alternate. Double or treble quantity.
    1 Lemon, fresh squeezed, (juice)
    1 tbsp Lemon peel (Zest)
    1 serving Splenda® (Granulated, 1 cup)
    1 1/2 Tbsp Cornstarch
    1 1/2 Tbsp Arrowroot Powder
    3/4 tsp Cinnamon, ground
    1/4 tsp Nutmeg, ground
    1/8 tsp Salt (Iodized, Kosher, or Sea Salt)
    1 Extra Large egg, whisked
    2 fl oz Water, tap (approximate)
    Non-stick cooking spray (Canola preferable)

Tips

Take your time and enjoy the story while preparing this traditional Down East treat. Add your own notes, make your own substitutions, and add your anecdotes or family history to your penciled up copy of the recipe.

Have Fun!!


Directions

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Lightly coat the pie pan with a non-stick cooking spray.

2. Place one crust into a 9-inch pie pan, regular or deep dish. Pierce the bottom and sides of the pie crust lightly with a fork to ensure smooth baking without bubbles.

3. Wash core, and thin slice apples; do not peel.
• Apple cores and seeds make great compost.

4. Juice one lemon, removing seeds. Zest lemon peel.
• Add the juiced lemon and peel to the compost.

5. Place apple slices into a large mixing bowl. Sprinkle lemon juice over apple slices. Toss lightly to prevent browning.

6. In a small bowl, combine Splenda, cornstarch, cinnamon, nutmeg, lemon zest, and salt. Sprinkle mixture over apple slices, toss to coat evenly.

7. Spoon apples into bottom pie crust. Mound slightly since baking will reduce apple volume.

8. Cut top crust into 3/4" ribbons. Arrange in lattice weave over apples, tucking outer edges between bottom crust and pie pan. Pinch into fluted edge, dampening with a little water if needed to seal.

9. (Optional). For a crisper, glazed lattice top, whisk one extra large or jumbo egg with a small amount of cold water. Paint lattices with egg mixture. The result will "gild the lily" for a beautiful and festive pie.

10. Bake in pre-heated 425° F oven in the middle rack 40 - 50 minutes or until top crust is golden. You can use a cake tester to check the apples which should be slightly firm but easily pierced.

11. Cool on cake rack grill for at least 20 minutes to allow apple "gravy" to firm up. Cover with linen or cotton tea towel

12. Serve warm or cold for a tummy pleasing dessert.
• Ice cream for "Ŕ La Mode" was not available in the winter
• Early Spring, when the snow was still deep and fresh-fallen, newly collected, still warm "sugared down" maple syrup drizzled over freshly fallen snow produces "Maple Lace".
• A scoop of Maple Lace made a fine addition to this Down-East favorite Apple Pie.
• Scrumptious!

Enjoy!


Serving Size: 8 servings (1/8 pie per serving)

Number of Servings: 1

Recipe submitted by SparkPeople user JLCONROD.

TAGS:  Desserts |

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